Does myopia occur earlier in children if their parents are myopic?

This multi-ethnic study found that parental myopia was a risk factor for myopia development in pre-school age children. The age the parents became myopic themselves had a dose-dependent effect in their children if both parents had onset of myopia before age 12. Eye care practitioners can use this to identify which children may benefit from early myopia treatment intervention.

How common is microbial keratitis in children wearing orthokeratology?

The risk of microbial keratitis (MK) in orthokeratology-wearing children was shown in a 2013 analysis to be around 14 per 10,000 patient wearing years, but new data indicates that it may be lower. Data gathered from a large group of practices in Russia found MK risk of around 5 per 10,000 patient-wearing years, similar to the risk of daily wear soft lenses. This should increase confidence in fitting orthokeratology to children for myopia control.

What is the effect of uncorrecting, undercorrecting and overcorrecting myopia in children?

This systematic review of 9 studies confirms that under-correction of myopia does not slow progression; rather, at least half of the studies have shown the myopia progression is accelerated. There was no benefit found in overcorrection, and the evidence for un-correction was equivocal. Clinically, this advocates for the full correction of myopia.

Exploring the limits of myopia control efficacy

Considering even emmetropic eyes elongate, what are the limits of myopia control efficacy? This novel analysis explores the absolute axial elongation of treated and untreated myopes in the MiSight 3-year clinical trial in comparison to previously published models of myopic and emmetropic eye growth. The results indicate a potential limit to the short-term percentage efficacy of myopia control treatments.

One-year myopia control efficacy of spectacle lenses with aspherical lenslets

This study reports one year results from an ongoing randomized clinical trial examining spectacle lenses with highly aspherical lenslet (HAL) or slightly aspherical lenslet (SAL) technology. The findings showed the HAL lens controlled refractive and axial progression by 60-70% and SAL by 30-40% over the first 12 months.

Influence of orthok treatment zone diameter and pupil diameter on myopia progression

This study evaluates how orthok treatment zone diameter influences change in refraction and axial eye length over 1-year in children previously fit with orthok lenses of varying back optic zone diameter, to reveal that where treatment zone diameter was less than pupil diameter orthok’s myopia control efficacy appeared to be improved.

MiSight’s Impact on Binocular and Accommodative Function

The purpose of this 2 year study was to determine the effect of MiSight contact lenses used to control myopia on binocular vision and accommodation in children, as compared with children wearing SV spectacles, with the researches finding no significant differences in binocular and accommodative measures between the study groups.

Determining the Optimal Concentration of Atropine

Despite being used for myopia management for many years, significant controversy exists in both literature and clinical optometric practice regarding the optimal concentration of atropine. The LAMP study sheds light on this mystery by investigating efficacy of 0.05%, 0.025% and 0.01% atropine for slowing myopia progression.