Science

Science

The difficulty in identifying fast-progressing myopes based on prior progression

Prediction modelling for future myopic progression was found to be more accurate when factors such as age, sex and ethnicity were considered, rather than prior progression. Myopia management should be initiated when myopia is apparent regardless of prior progression, rather than waiting to assess the progression rate.

Can previous progression predict future myopia?

The SCORM study analyzed the relationship between myopia progression a year after baseline and subsequent 2-year progression for myopic Singaporean children. Progression and age at baseline were found to be strongly associated with subsequent progression. However, they were shown to have limited predictive values and other factors are likely to determine future progression.

Blur adaptation in children wearing orthokeratology

After 1 month of wearing orthokeratology lenses, children were shown to have reduced accommodative lag and increased blur sensitivity, leading to the suggestion that blur adaptation is conducive in achieving good visual acuities and visual function in ortho-k wear.

Can we predict success with orthokeratology?

This study investigated the accuracy of using pre-treatment axial elongation and changes in refractive sphere in predicting myopia control success in orthokeratology. Axial length was the more accurate method for categorisation of slow, moderate or rapid progression, and fast progressors benefited the most from ortho-k wear.

Time spent outdoors improves success with MiSight 1 day

This paper identified time spent outdoors as the key factor in predicting better myopia control outcomes in children wearing with MiSight 1 day contact lenses. Other factors which weren’t predictive included age, refraction, binocular vision findings, pupil size and time spent at near.

Do multi-zone myopia control lenses maintain their defocus profiles at all viewing distances?

This study showed that multi-zone spectacle and contact lenses used for myopia control provide myopic defocus at far distances. At near, changes in accommodative lag, pupil miosis and spherical aberration in individuals may mean there are lesser amounts of myopic defocus and reduced image quality. However, all the lenses were still able to provide sufficient image clarity at near for typical size print.

How we can identify future myopes

The axial length growth trajectories modelled in this study revealed that regardless of a child’s age, a myopic shift of at least -0.85D and/or 0.74mm over three years suggests future myopia development. Read more about specific risk factors for younger children, and other ocular component findings in this large study of European children.

Dual focus contact lenses and near viewing

This study examines the effect that dual focus contact lenses have on accommodation and defocus during near viewing, and the results provide clues towards understanding the myopia control mechanism of these contact lenses.

Myopia control and no rebound with Highly Aspherical Lenslet spectacles

This cross-over study investigated children wearing highly aspherical lenslet (HAL) spectacle lenses versus single vision spectacles over three six-month periods. The HAL lenses showed consistent myopia control efficacy and no rebound effect when discontinued over one of the six-month periods.

Dry eye and myopia in teenagers

This abstract reported on the association between myopia and dry eye disease in teenagers. Interestingly, dry eye disease and reduced break up time was associated with higher myopia, but photophobia and pain were not.