Science

Efficacy

Can orthokeratology be used to slow the progression of anisomyopia?

This meta-analysis investigated the effectiveness of orthokeratology in controlling the progression of anisomyopia (unilateral myopia or bilateral anisomyopia) in Chinese children. Total anisomyopia decreased at 2-year follow up, indicating orthokeratology may be a safe clinical method to slow myopia progression coupled with reducing interocular axial length difference. 

Can using atropine enhance myopia control with orthokeratology?

This meta-analysis of 5 studies of 1, 6 and 12 months duration found that slower axial growth is evident when using orthokeratology in conjunction with atropine as a combined therapy compared to orthokeratology alone. A slowing effect of 0.09mm was seen with the combined approach for up to a 12 month follow-up period. Longer data was not available for the meta-analysis.

What is the effect of uncorrecting, undercorrecting and overcorrecting myopia in children?

This systematic review of 9 studies confirms that under-correction of myopia does not slow progression; rather, at least half of the studies have shown the myopia progression is accelerated. There was no benefit found in overcorrection, and the evidence for un-correction was equivocal. Clinically, this advocates for the full correction of myopia.

Long term myopia control efficacy of MiSight 1 Day

After the 3-year MiSight 1 day clinical trial, the control group children were switched to MiSight. A ‘virtual control group’ mathematical model, previously published, was utilized to demonstrate a continued myopia control effect across six years, plus effectiveness of treatment for children who commenced wear at age 11-15 years.

How to assess the efficacy of myopia control treatments

This landmark paper examines the theory underlying the reporting of myopia control efficacy and the sequelae of such investigation. The authors propose an alternate method of reporting efficacy; Cumulative Absolute Reduction in Axial Elongation (CARE), which conveys the benefit that a child receiving a specified treatment might expect, independent of age, progression rate, refractive error and ethnicity over a stated time period.