Science

Clinical management

Can we predict success with orthokeratology?

This study investigated the accuracy of using pre-treatment axial elongation and changes in refractive sphere in predicting myopia control success in orthokeratology. Axial length was the more accurate method for categorisation of slow, moderate or rapid progression, and fast progressors benefited the most from ortho-k wear.

How we can identify future myopes

The axial length growth trajectories modelled in this study revealed that regardless of a child’s age, a myopic shift of at least -0.85D and/or 0.74mm over three years suggests future myopia development. Read more about specific risk factors for younger children, and other ocular component findings in this large study of European children.

Myopia control and no rebound with Highly Aspherical Lenslet spectacles

This cross-over study investigated children wearing highly aspherical lenslet (HAL) spectacle lenses versus single vision spectacles over three six-month periods. The HAL lenses showed consistent myopia control efficacy and no rebound effect when discontinued over one of the six-month periods.

Dry eye and myopia in teenagers

This abstract reported on the association between myopia and dry eye disease in teenagers. Interestingly, dry eye disease and reduced break up time was associated with higher myopia, but photophobia and pain were not.

IMI 2021 Yearly Digest

The IMI 2021 Yearly Digest summarized recent updates and progress in research of myopia, taking in all publications since the IMI Volume One reports published in early 2019. Each of the Volume One reports included an update – definitions, interventions, genetics, experimental models, clinical trial guidance, ethical considerations and clinical management. While further research is needed, the strengthening evidence base indicates eye care practitioners should embrace proactive myopia management.

IMI Report on Prevention of myopia and its progression

In myopic children, interventions to slow progression are warranted to prevent the development of high myopia and subsequent pathology and also to reduce the economic burden caused by uncorrected and pathologic myopia. This IMI Report describes the latest advice on preventing the development and progression of myopia – read the summary here.

IMI Report on Pathologic Myopia

This IMI Report takes a deep dive into pathological myopia, including its prevalence and defining characteristics. The role of optical coherence tomography (OCT) is discussed, as well as emerging treatment options. Read the summary here.

Can myopia calculators accurately predict children’s myopia progression?

This study investigated the accuracy of the Brien Holden Vision Institute (BHVI) myopia calculator in predicting myopia progression. The extent of myopia progression over 1-2 years in children corrected with single vision spectacles was accurately predicted by the BHVI myopia calculator in 32-38% of 7-13 year old Hong Kong children. Around one-third progressed more and one-third progressed less than the range predicted by the calculator.

What is the effect of uncorrecting, undercorrecting and overcorrecting myopia in children?

This systematic review of 9 studies confirms that under-correction of myopia does not slow progression; rather, at least half of the studies have shown the myopia progression is accelerated. There was no benefit found in overcorrection, and the evidence for un-correction was equivocal. Clinically, this advocates for the full correction of myopia.

Myopia Management in the netherlands: advice and outcomes from a new protocol

The Erasmus Medical Group in the Netherlands set out four steps in their myopia management protocol: providing visual environment advice, identifying high-risk myopes by axial length and treating them with atropine 0.5%, managing other myopes with optical treatments or lower-concentration atropine, and ceasing treatment in the late teens once axial length is stable. The described use of axial length percentile growth charts for diagnosis, choice of treatment, monitoring and cessation is a world-first.