Posterior Scleral Reinforcement as a means of myopia control

Pathologic myopia is one of the major causes of blindness worldwide (Xu).1 Degenerative changes associated with high myopia, including posterior staphyloma formation and scleral thinning, are caused by the progressive elongation of globe axial length and stretching of the sclera, choroid and retina.2 The aim of this meta-analysis was to investigate and quantitatively define the efficacy of PSR in controlling axial elongation and refraction progression.

How outdoor time influences myopia prevention and control

There is general widespread accepted belief that increasing time spent outdoors can be protective against progression of myopia. Xiong et al set out to better understand the research by performing a meta-analysis of 51 clinical trials and longitudinal studies that investigated the relationship between time spent outdoors and the risk of either developing myopia, progression of existing myopia or a myopic shift in refractive error.

A tale of two studies measuring change to axial length in myopia

Being able to assess myopia progression in a similar way to height and weight using growth curves is beneficial for both practitioners and patients as it provides a comparison against a calculated average, helping to predict future high myopes and track progression and control outcomes. How to growth charts from European and Asian studies compare? We explore the comparisons, advantages and disadvantages of using growth charts for axial length in myopia.

How to assess the efficacy of myopia control treatments

This landmark paper examines the theory underlying the reporting of myopia control efficacy and the sequelae of such investigation. The authors propose an alternate method of reporting efficacy; Cumulative Absolute Reduction in Axial Elongation (CARE), which conveys the benefit that a child receiving a specified treatment might expect, independent of age, progression rate, refractive error and ethnicity over a stated time period.

Smartphone use in myopic vs non-myopic Irish students

This paper investigates the relationship between myopia, the objective measure of smartphone data usage and self reported duration of smartphone use in school children and university students with a secondary aim to assess whether study outcomes changed with age.

Adverse event rates in paediatric soft CL wear

This retrospective cohort study established the prevalence of adverse events (AEs) in children wearing SCL’s to report rates of microbial keratitis (MK) and other inflammatory adverse events in children wearing SCL’s to be comparable to established rates among adults wearing SCL’s.

The association between digital screen time and myopia

For many children using digital devices is a normal part of their everyday lives and they will use computers and hand-held devices at school and at home. This systematic review collates this published research to illuminate current understanding on the association between the time children spend on digital devices and incidence, prevalence or progression of myopia.

October 2020 myopia research update

The association between Near Work Activities and Myopia in Children, Growth curves to clinically monitor refractive development in Chinese schoolchildren and much more…

The association between near work activities and myopia in children

The visual demand of concentrating on close-up tasks like reading and studying are thought to be a driving force for increased myopia in children. To better understand this relationship the authors consolidated data from several studies to quantify the effect of near work activities on myopia in children and discover any association there may be between them.