Clinical

Clinical management

Why Each Dioptre Matters

We all know that high myopia is associated with higher incidences of retinal detachment, glaucoma and myopic maculopathy1. Instigating early, evidence based myopia control in rapidly progressing myopes gives the best outcomes both pathophysiologically and refractively. However when faced with a low, slower progressing myope, or a patient whom has already progressed is there any point in persisting with myopia control?

An Ode To My Retinoscope

In May 2019 the professional journal Contact Lens Spectrum published my bi-annual ‘Refractive Focus’ column, entitled ‘An Ode to my Retinoscope’.

IMI – Clinical Management Guidelines Supplementary Digital Content

The landmark International Myopia Institute (IMI) White paper reports were published on 28 February 2019. As lead author on the Clinical Management Guidelines paper, I was thrilled to see the work of my 13 co-authors and I shared with a keen clinician audience worldwide.

Which option to slow myopia? New Clinical Management Infographic

We’re excited to release our new clear, concise and clinically relevant infographic Which option to slow myopia?to help you with what we have learnt is the main practitioner need in myopia management, and the most popular discussion topic in the Myopia Profile Facebook group – guidance in selecting the right treatment for your patient. A world first, evidence based decision making tool.

Axial length measurement – a clinical necessity?

Most eye care practitioners don’t routinely measure axial length in clinical practice, mainly due to lack of access to the instrumentation and its expense. This is not the only reason, though, that axial length (AXL) measurement is a bit of a problematic measure for gauging myopia management success in a clinical setting.

Eight Myopia Mysteries (plus eight more!)

This article groups common clinical treatments in an effort to explore what we do and don’t know regarding myopia control efficacy. It highlights the need to balance the available evidence with emerging knowledge when discussing options for myopia control with patients and their carers.

Contact lenses for kids – paediatric, parent and practitioner psychology

When selecting an optical treatment for myopia management, contact lens options appear to be the most consistent, with OrthoK and multifocal soft contact lenses offering around a 50% efficacy for controlling refractive and axial change in myopia.1 And it’s not just the important benefit of modifying lifelong risk of vision impairment through successful myopia control which should be top of mind – contact lens wear for myopic children can offer significant immediate benefits to their self-perception and satisfaction with vision correction.

Contact lens safety in kids

A key barrier to contact lens wear in children is parental and practitioner concern about safety. The research indicates, though, that children may be the safest contact lens wearers – here we describe the statistics and how to approach clinical communication.

Myopia management message part 2 – efficacy

Let’s cut to the chase – until further notice, you can consider low dose (0.05%) atropine, soft multifocal CL’s and OrthoK as all quite similar in terms of their myopia control efficacy, being around 50% on average. A network meta-analysis of sixteen different interventions studied for myopia control showed these options to all have similar efficacy when their refractive and axial length outcomes were put on a level playing field.