Optimizing distance vision with MiSight 1 day

Why might a patient experience blurred distance vision with MiSight 1 day contact lenses? Lens fit, centration, prescription and adaptation can all feature. Learn more about the frequency and management of these cases, including the reported outcomes in scientific studies.

Which contact lens should we choose for sports?

If a child is wearing spectacles or using atropine as their primary myopia control treatment, which contact lens should we choose for sports? Is a myopia controlling contact lens needed if it will only be for occasional wear? Here we discuss the options and clinical considerations based on the individual patient.

Choosing an instrument to measure axial length

The value and importance of axial length measurement in myopia control is growing. As you offer myopia control to more patients, you could start to consider which instrument to use to measure axial length. How do ultrasound and interferometry instruments compare in accuracy? What about the new generation combination instruments? Here we address the practicalities of axial length measurement.

A mismatch between myopia and axial length

This case study describes two examples of myopia and axial length mismatch – a low myope with long eyes and high myope with short eyes. With axial length becoming more available and crucial in myopia management, it’s important to understand that the relationship between refraction and axial length isn’t always consistent. Find out more regarding the other ocular components that can influence refractive error.

Communicating with an ophthalmologist about orthokeratology

How do you manage your young patient when their ophthalmologist appears to have advised parents against orthokeratology? How should you communicate with the ophthalmologist about orthokeratology? This clinical case explores the aspects of safety, efficacy and benefits, including detail on the comparison of short-term risks of contact lens wear with the long-term risks of myopia.

Communicating with parents who reject myopia correction

How do you approach communicating with parents about myopia when they reject even standard single vision correction for their child? This is especially concerning given that even a full strength single vision correction is a better choice than under- or un-correction of myopia – for both myopia progression as well as the child’s functional abilities. This clinical problem is more common than you might think, especially in some regions of the world.

Do pseudophakic children need myopia control?

How does the normal emmetropization process in childhood influence refraction shifts in pseudophakes? Should a myopic shift in a pseudophakic child be viewed as myopia progression? How should they be managed and is myopia control needed? This blog covers important considerations in managing these atypical myopes.

An hyperopic myope? Marfan syndrome and aphakia.

When is a hyperope actually a myope? This case presents an aphakic patient with Marfan syndrome and an extremely long axial length, who needs to be managed like a high myope. This post also discusses a variety of pharmacological approaches to myopia management, based on a fascinating case presented in the subsequent Facebook discussion.

Refraction challenges in children – what to prescribe?

Children can be tricky to refract. Here is a challenging refraction case discussed by colleagues – while not a case of a myope, it describes useful clinical principles for prescribing for children, especially children under 6 who require particular consideration to ensure normal visual development.

A myope or not? Pseudomyopia, antimetropia and more

Refraction can be challenging in children, and even more so in a complex presentation as for this case. Is this patient a myope or not? When dealing with a complex case of pseudomyopia, antimetropia and latent hyperopia, all in one patient – how should we manage the patient? The answer involves balancing goals to manage ametropia correction, binocular vision function and myopia control.