Examining the posture of myopic children during various near tasks

This study investigated the working distance and head posture of Chinese myopic children while reading, writing and playing video games. The average working distance across all tasks was 24.5cm, with the shortest working distance and largest head declination observed while children played video games. There was no influence of level of myopia or accommodative lag on working distance or head position. 

When to start myopia control

When to start myopia management

Myopia is becoming more common, as knowledge on detection and management increase. When should you start myopia control? Here we present an overview of when you might start myopia management across the spectrum of patient presentations. Since every child and their family are unique, we also point you towards more information for each situation.

New meta-analysis on digital device use and myopia

This new systematic review and meta-analysis has evaluated use of smartphones and tablets separately to computer use and other non-screen based near work. Results are still mixed but overall there was a trend for a slightly increased risk with mobile device use alone, which increased when combined with computer use. More objective measures of screen time are needed to further explore this link.

COVID-19 and Myopia

Post-COVID-19 and myopia: what’s next for children’s vision?

The COVID-19 pandemic saw widespread home confinement, increased screen time in children with home-based learning, and decreased time spent outdoors. Several recent publications have explored the impact of this period of time on the incidence and progression of myopia, lifestyle behaviours, digital eye strain, myopia treatment efficacy and more. What should we now monitor and discuss with our young myopic patients in the post-COVID world?

Lifestyle changes for Chinese school children during COVID-19 home confinement

A vision-screening program was able to provide data before and after Chinese schoolchildren were confined to home learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. Overall, more hours were spent indoors and less time was spent outdoors during this time, across all age groups. The younger schoolchildren had increased incidence of myopia and faster progression, whereas an increase in the prevalence of high myopia was found in the older children.

Increased myopia during the COVID-19 pandemic

Children aged 6 to 8 years old in China were found to experience a mean -0.30D myopic shift and a significant increase in myopia prevalence during a 5-month long COVID-19 home confinement period. Due to their age and corresponding critical stage in visual development, the change in the children’s environment and lifestyle may have been more responsible for their increased myopia than the increased online learning.

Myopic Adult Risks to kids

Talking to a myopic adult about risks for their children

Adults with myopia may not understand that they have more than just a problem seeing clearly. We discuss genetic risk in glaucoma and macular degeneration – are you doing the same for myopia? How can we talk to myopic adults about risks for their children and support them to take action?

Restricting children gaming myopia

Will online gaming restrictions reduce childhood myopia?

Will China’s new regulations restricting online gaming in children reduce the myopia crisis? Is there evidence that less screen time increases outdoor time? We explore the links and impacts, positive effects of gaming and advice for parents.

When myopia management is not working after COVID-19 home confinement

During the COVID-19 pandemic, governments imposed home confinement and school-based learning was the normal. Has this caused more myopia? In this clinical case, the unique environment of lockdown is explored in view of myopia management outcomes.