A monocular myope with coloboma

An 8-year-old child is essentially monocular, due to unilateral high myopia associated with coloboma. The normally sighted eye has low myopia. How should we best balance safety and proactive myopia control in such a case?

Managing unilateral myopia

Unilateral myopia can present a challenge to both myopia correction and control choices. In this case study, learn about which interventions have evidence for myopia control and reducing anisometropia, as well as the considerations for monocular versus binocular correction and treatment.

Is it myopia progression or early keratoconus?

How would you manage a progressing myope with early keratoconus? In this case, refractive progression of myopia was not just due to axial elongation, and astute repeated measurement of both the corneal curvature and axial length helped with accurate diagnosis.

Managing a teenager with very high myopia

In this case study of a teenager with around 15D of myopia and moderate astigmatism, discussion included ocular and systemic health, contact lens options and whether myopia control is necessary.

Retinal detachment in children

Retinal detachment is not a condition which only affects adults. This case of a 12-year-old high myope with an asymptomatic retinal detachment and hole forms the basis for discussion of factors, frequency of types and treatment outcomes in childhood retinal detachment. The myopia control strategy is also discussed.

managing treating high myopia

How should we manage high myopia?

Children, teens and adults with high myopia need special consideration of not just myopia control, but the best type of myopia correction and the importance of ocular health management. Do high myopes progress more quickly? What are the risks and management options?

Do pseudophakic children need myopia control?

How does the normal emmetropization process in childhood influence refraction shifts in pseudophakes? Should a myopic shift in a pseudophakic child be viewed as myopia progression? How should they be managed and is myopia control needed? This blog covers important considerations in managing these atypical myopes.

An hyperopic myope? Marfan syndrome and aphakia.

When is a hyperope actually a myope? This case presents an aphakic patient with Marfan syndrome and an extremely long axial length, who needs to be managed like a high myope. This post also discusses a variety of pharmacological approaches to myopia management, based on a fascinating case presented in the subsequent Facebook discussion.

Thinking beyond myopia – managing the very high childhood myope

Children with more than 5-6D of myopia can require special consideration to ensure safe management of their ocular and systemic health. This clinical case details important aspects of care for the very high childhood myope: ophthalmology co-management, best optical corrections, parental education and eye health monitoring.

Managing a myopic anisometropic amblyopic child

This case is not your typical astigmatic myope. There are several features to this patient that require careful consideration, including high myopia, amblyopia, myopia correction and control, and eye health management.