Choroidal thickening in response to DIMS spectacle lens wear

This study reported that children wearing DIMS spectacle lenses showed increased sub-foveal choroidal thickness than controls at 1 week which increased in the first 6 months and was maintained at 2 years. There was a correlation between more choroidal thickening and less axial elongation, but choroidal thickening only explained around 8% of the variation in axial length.

Do myopia controlling spectacles with lenslets affect visual quality?

When looking through the ‘treatment zones’ of three different types of myopia controlling spectacle lenses with lenslets, visual acuity is reduced by 3-5 letters and mid-to-high frequency contrast sensitivity is mildly affected compared to single vision spectacles. We’re yet to learn if small differences between designs may influence patient preference. 

The next generation – DIMS and H.A.L.T. technology spectacle lenses for myopia control

The newest myopia controlling spectacles can both correct and control myopia as effectively as contact lens options. How do Defocus Incorporated Multiple Segments (DIMS) and HIghly Aspherical Lenslet Target (H.A.L.T.) technology spectacle lenses work? Here we investigate and compare their design, presumed mechanism and comparative efficacy for myopia control, based on published research.

One-year myopia control efficacy of spectacle lenses with aspherical lenslets

This study reports one year results from an ongoing randomized clinical trial examining spectacle lenses with highly aspherical lenslet (HAL) or slightly aspherical lenslet (SAL) technology. The findings showed the HAL lens controlled refractive and axial progression by 60-70% and SAL by 30-40% over the first 12 months.

Spectacle Lenses for Myopia Control Part 3: new designs and latest studies

Providing spectacle correction is one of the cornerstones of primary eye care, and myopia controlling spectacles can both correct and control myopia. Here we explore the current myopia controlling spectacle lenses which have or are being commercialized, for which peer-reviewed publications are available – their design, presumed mechanism and comparative efficacy.

A myope or not? Pseudomyopia, antimetropia and more

Refraction can be challenging in children, and even more so in a complex presentation as for this case. Is this patient a myope or not? When dealing with a complex case of pseudomyopia, antimetropia and latent hyperopia, all in one patient – how should we manage the patient? The answer involves balancing goals to manage ametropia correction, binocular vision function and myopia control. 

Managing a 5-year-old pre-myope

Pre-myopes can be readily identified, and best practice dictates that we should offer some form of intervention to help delay the onset of myopia. In this case we discuss the features of a pre-myope and an example in a 5 year old patient who satisfies the refractive criteria for pre-myopia, and has a strong family history of myopia.

Do you need to treat esophoria in an emmetropic patient?

Esophoria at near is a risk factor for myopia development and progression. Does it need to be managed in an emmetropic patient without symptoms? Is this patient a pre-myope, and how should this factor into management? Read this interesting clinical case, where colleagues discuss whether to intervene or not, and how to potentially manage both myopia risk and binocular vision.

A two-year-old with low myopia – to correct or not?

Would you prescribe glasses for a young child with mild myopia? Is myopia control beneficial for a toddler? This case discussion covers whether to treat or monitor, with the research evidence for prescribing as well as clinical considerations for co-management between primary eye care and ophthalmology.

What to do when a patient doesn’t respond to atropine

What do you do when your patient doesn’t respond to your low-dose atropine treatment? This case explores the nuances in navigating management when atropine doesn’t work as well as you might expect.