IMI Report on Prevention of myopia and its progression

In myopic children, interventions to slow progression are warranted to prevent the development of high myopia and subsequent pathology and also to reduce the economic burden caused by uncorrected and pathologic myopia. This IMI Report describes the latest advice on preventing the development and progression of myopia – read the summary here.

Clinical Leader Case Study: Managing myopia with the family

This case is highlights that myopia management decision making includes much more than a child’s refraction. Learn how Keyur Patel involved the parent in the conversation and decision making, to determine the starting myopia management option for now, as well as considering the future.

Two-year clinical trial results of aspherical lenslet spectacles for myopia control

This study reports two year results from a randomized clinical trial examining myopia control spectacle lenses with highly aspherical lenslets (HAL) or slightly aspherical lenslets (SAL). The findings showed the HAL lens controlled refractive and axial progression by 50-55% and SAL by around 30% over two years. Read more about the outcomes and comparisons to other myopia control spectacles here.

What is the effect of uncorrecting, undercorrecting and overcorrecting myopia in children?

This systematic review of 9 studies confirms that under-correction of myopia does not slow progression; rather, at least half of the studies have shown the myopia progression is accelerated. There was no benefit found in overcorrection, and the evidence for un-correction was equivocal. Clinically, this advocates for the full correction of myopia.

How should we manage a presbyopic progressing myope?

The myopia history in childhood can influence how an adult myope copes with their correction and even how their vision changes over time. Read more about this case of a 50-year-old progressing myope.

Choroidal thickening in response to DIMS spectacle lens wear

This study reported that children wearing DIMS spectacle lenses showed increased sub-foveal choroidal thickness than controls at 1 week which increased in the first 6 months and was maintained at 2 years. There was a correlation between more choroidal thickening and less axial elongation, but choroidal thickening only explained around 8% of the variation in axial length.

Do myopia controlling spectacles with lenslets affect visual quality?

When looking through the ‘treatment zones’ of three different types of myopia controlling spectacle lenses with lenslets, visual acuity is reduced by 3-5 letters and mid-to-high frequency contrast sensitivity is mildly affected compared to single vision spectacles. We’re yet to learn if small differences between designs may influence patient preference.¬†

The next generation – DIMS and H.A.L.T. technology spectacle lenses for myopia control

The newest myopia controlling spectacles can both correct and control myopia as effectively as contact lens options. How do Defocus Incorporated Multiple Segments (DIMS) and HIghly Aspherical Lenslet Target (H.A.L.T.) technology spectacle lenses work? Here we investigate and compare their design, presumed mechanism and comparative efficacy for myopia control, based on published research.

One-year myopia control efficacy of spectacle lenses with aspherical lenslets

This study reports one year results from an ongoing randomized clinical trial examining spectacle lenses with highly aspherical lenslet (HAL) or slightly aspherical lenslet (SAL) technology. The findings showed the HAL lens controlled refractive and axial progression by 60-70% and SAL by 30-40% over the first 12 months.

Spectacle Lenses for Myopia Control Part 3: new designs and latest studies

Providing spectacle correction is one of the cornerstones of primary eye care, and myopia controlling spectacles can both correct and control myopia. Here we explore the current myopia controlling spectacle lenses which have or are being commercialized, for which peer-reviewed publications are available – their design, presumed mechanism and comparative efficacy.