Getting started – choosing a treatment for fast myopia progressors

Myopia control is vital for children with fast myopia progression. What are the key risk factors for faster myopia progression? What clinical findings indicate a more proactive myopia management strategy may be required? This case describes risk factors and evidence-based treatment options for fast myopia progressors.

How can we set myopia control expectations?

When setting myopia control expectations both at outset and follow up, it is important to compare the child’s observed myopia progression to ‘average’, and to then judge the expected outcomes of treatment. Bringing their lifestyle, motivations and abilities into consideration is also important. Here we explore how to use resources in practice to set expectations and gauge success along the way.

Which contact lens should we choose for sports?

If a child is wearing spectacles or using atropine as their primary myopia control treatment, which contact lens should we choose for sports? Is a myopia controlling contact lens needed if it will only be for occasional wear? Here we discuss the options and clinical considerations based on the individual patient.

Keys to Communication Myopia Management

Keys to Communication in Myopia Management

Communicating the reasons, benefits and options in myopia management can be complex. Using pictures in health communications has been shown to improve patient attention, recall and comprehension of information and adherence to treatment. The Managing Myopia Guidelines Infographics are designed to guide you through the process of explaining myopia control using simple messaging and pictures. We explain the four key messages of myopia management here.

Gauging success in myopia management

How can you tell if your myopia management strategy has been a success? Our new Myopia Profile ‘Managing Myopia Guidelines’ infographics translate research into practice, providing advice on gauging success by both refraction and axial length outcomes. Given that refraction is universally measured in clinical myopia practice, there is particular emphasis on understanding how much refraction change after a year of treatment indicates whether expected efficacy for that intervention has been attained.

Refraction challenges in children – what to prescribe?

Children can be tricky to refract. Here is a challenging refraction case discussed by colleagues – while not a case of a myope, it describes useful clinical principles for prescribing for children, especially children under 6 who require particular consideration to ensure normal visual development.

A myope or not? Pseudomyopia, antimetropia and more

Refraction can be challenging in children, and even more so in a complex presentation as for this case. Is this patient a myope or not? When dealing with a complex case of pseudomyopia, antimetropia and latent hyperopia, all in one patient – how should we manage the patient? The answer involves balancing goals to manage ametropia correction, binocular vision function and myopia control. 

How much orthokeratology over-correction is ideal?

Orthokeratology is designed to achieve slight over-correction so the optical treatment will last all day. How much overcorrection is ideal to achieve good vision throughout the day while achieving good visual performance?