A monocular myope with coloboma

An 8-year-old child is essentially monocular, due to unilateral high myopia associated with coloboma. The normally sighted eye has low myopia. How should we best balance safety and proactive myopia control in such a case?

Monocular Myopia Management

Monocular Myopia Management: unilateral and anisometropic myopia

How should you best manage children with unilateral or anisometropic myopia? Learn about what drives aniso-myopic development, associations with amblyopia and ocular pathology, and the evidence base for orthokeratology to slow aniso-myopic eye growth.

Is it myopia progression or early keratoconus?

How would you manage a progressing myope with early keratoconus? In this case, refractive progression of myopia was not just due to axial elongation, and astute repeated measurement of both the corneal curvature and axial length helped with accurate diagnosis.

Retinal detachment in children

Retinal detachment is not a condition which only affects adults. This case of a 12-year-old high myope with an asymptomatic retinal detachment and hole forms the basis for discussion of factors, frequency of types and treatment outcomes in childhood retinal detachment. The myopia control strategy is also discussed.

Five year cumulative incidence of myopic maculopathy in Germany

This study utilized data from over 15,000 participants aged 35-74 years and found a five-year cumulative incidence (new onset) of myopic maculopathy in the general population of 3 in 1,000. In 509 eyes with over 6D of myopia, 7% had myopic maculopathy and of these 50% worsened over the study period.

Influence of atropine on retinal signaling in a mouse model

This research showed that the concentration of atropine which reaches the retina is 400 times less than by topical administration; and that higher concentrations directly exposed to the mouse retina influence retinal signaling. Whether this is indicates a possible mechanism or unintended impact of atropine, and how this may translate to atropine use in humans, is unknown.

Measuring the whole eye in myopia

Axial length (AXL) has been well established as the critical measurement in myopia control research. The measurement accuracy and link to disease risk make AXL increasingly important in a clinical setting. But what else should we measure in the myopic eye? Does the cornea change as well? Will we end up doing away with refraction? Read more on measuring the whole eye in myopia.

Do pseudophakic children need myopia control?

How does the normal emmetropization process in childhood influence refraction shifts in pseudophakes? Should a myopic shift in a pseudophakic child be viewed as myopia progression? How should they be managed and is myopia control needed? This blog covers important considerations in managing these atypical myopes.

An hyperopic myope? Marfan syndrome and aphakia.

When is a hyperope actually a myope? This case presents an aphakic patient with Marfan syndrome and an extremely long axial length, who needs to be managed like a high myope. This post also discusses a variety of pharmacological approaches to myopia management, based on a fascinating case presented in the subsequent Facebook discussion.

Posterior Scleral Reinforcement as a means of myopia control

Pathologic myopia is one of the major causes of blindness worldwide. Degenerative changes associated with high myopia, including posterior staphyloma formation and scleral thinning, are caused by the progressive elongation of globe axial length and stretching of the sclera, choroid and retina. The aim of this meta-analysis was to investigate and quantitatively define the efficacy of PSR in controlling axial elongation and refraction progression.