Is orthokeratology useful for control of low myopia?

There’s a common clinical belief that orthokeratology doesn’t work as well in lower myopes for myopia control. This is even sometimes included in conference presentations as prescribing advice. Is orthokeratology useful for control of low myopia? Here’s what’s fact and what’s fiction, when considering its efficacy for low vs high myopia, and orthokeratology vs multifocal contact lens myopia control.

patient doesn't respond to orthok

When a patient doesn’t respond to Orthokeratology

What do you do when your patient doesn’t respond to your orthokeratology (orthoK) treatment and things don’t add up? Here’s a case for you where an optometrist had to become a bit more investigative to determine the cause.

What to do when a patient doesn’t respond to atropine

What do you do when your patient doesn’t respond to your low-dose atropine treatment? This case explores the nuances in navigating management when atropine doesn’t work as well as you might expect.

Evaluation of simulated orthokeratology in a soft contact lens for myopia control

Soft contact lenses designed to simulate the change in refraction optical pro-file from orthokeratology (OK) fail to slow axial eye elongation or change to refrac-tion over 1-year of wear in children, leading to suggestion that OK’s propensity to slow myopia progression may not be due to changes OK makes to optical profile.

Axial length measurement; a clinical necessity?

Six questions on axial length measurement in myopia management

This review covers how well axial length relates to refraction and predicting future myopia, how to measure axial length, its value in orthokeratology and atropine management, how axial length influences a treatment plan and can you practice myopia management without it.

Patient progressing after treatment withdraw therapy myopia worse

Myopia Rebound: Back with a Vengeance

You may be ready to cease treatment, or the patient has done so of their own accord. Then you observe that the rate of myopic progression accelerates again – a myopia rebound effect. When does this happen? Can you avoid it? What should you consider doing in practice?