Which is best? Myopia Management for an astigmatic myope

Contact lens options are ideal for higher myopes. What about when they have moderate astigmatism as well? This case discusses the evidence base for myopia control options which correct for astigmatism, along with patient-specific considerations and whether a combination treatment with atropine is needed.

Combination atropine orthokeratology

Combination atropine treatments: when more is more

Atropine is a treatment for myopia control, but do combination treatments such as with orthokeratology increase the efficacy? Learn about how well it works, which concentration, for whom it works best, side effects, treatment duration and more.

Combining atropine and orthokeratology for a fast progressing myope

In this clinical case, the practitioner is considering whether to start a young patient on a monotherapy or go straight to combination treatment. The discussion includes the recent studies on combination treatment and the best approach for utilizing atropine in view of orthokeratology wear.

Managing a teenager with very high myopia

In this case study of a teenager with around 15D of myopia and moderate astigmatism, discussion included ocular and systemic health, contact lens options and whether myopia control is necessary.

Retinal detachment in children

Retinal detachment is not a condition which only affects adults. This case of a 12-year-old high myope with an asymptomatic retinal detachment and hole forms the basis for discussion of factors, frequency of types and treatment outcomes in childhood retinal detachment. The myopia control strategy is also discussed.

Getting started – choosing a treatment for fast myopia progressors

Myopia control is vital for children with fast myopia progression. What are the key risk factors for faster myopia progression? What clinical findings indicate a more proactive myopia management strategy may be required? This case describes risk factors and evidence-based treatment options for fast myopia progressors.

Can we reconsider contact lenses?

Contact lenses offer numerous functional, psychological and myopia controlling benefits for children. What should you do if a parent or patient says no to contact lenses for their child, and you consider it an ideal option? How can you approach communication to convey the safety and benefits?

Orthokeratology treatment zone diameter in slow and fast progressors

A sample of slow and fast progressors in prior 24 month orthokeratology clinical trials were found to have the same baseline refraction and axial length. The slow progressors were older, and showed 0.5mm smaller treatment zone diameters (TZDs), but no difference in induced peripheral myopic shift. There was also no direct correlation between TZD and axial elongation, indicating an intriguing but not yet defined relationship.

Kids and contact lenses – benefits, safety and getting to ‘yes’

There are numerous reasons why contact lenses are beneficial for children, and the safety profile is high. Yet there are still barriers in the mind of the practitioner, parent and young patient to childhood CL wear. Here we address these often cited barriers, with the goal to support your clinical communication on the benefits and safety of contact lenses for kids, to move towards achieving a ‘yes’ from the parent and patient.