Atropine 0.01% combined with orthokeratology over two years

Atropine 0.01% combined with orthokeratology slows axial elongation to less than 0.1mm/year over two years in Chinese children aged 6-11 years. This is the equal-longest study on this topic and first to measure potential mechanisms of pupil size and choroidal thickness. The largest effect of the combination occurred in the first 6 months.

IMI Report on Prevention of myopia and its progression

In myopic children, interventions to slow progression are warranted to prevent the development of high myopia and subsequent pathology and also to reduce the economic burden caused by uncorrected and pathologic myopia. This IMI Report describes the latest advice on preventing the development and progression of myopia – read the summary here.

Managing the non-myopic eye in unilateral myopia

If your patient is a unilateral myope, sometimes the myopic eye is the easier one to manage! This case study explores the options to appropriately diagnose, track and manage the non-myopic eye in a unilateral myope – where the non-myopic eye seems to be progressing faster than the myopic eye treated with orthokeratology.

Orthokeratology lens wear in lagophthalmos

Can a teen with lagophthalmos wear orthokeratology lenses? This case discusses the staining frequency in orthokeratology wear, the impact of lubricant eye drops and lens hygiene processes, and more tips for patient care.

Complex myopia cases: unilateral myopia with high astigmatism

Managing unilateral myopia with high astigmatism is complex, especially with reduced acuity. Is myopia control the best approach? Myopia correction versus myopia control is discussed in this case, along with further assessments and considerations in management.

Can orthokeratology be used to slow the progression of anisomyopia?

This meta-analysis investigated the effectiveness of orthokeratology in controlling the progression of anisomyopia (unilateral myopia or bilateral anisomyopia) in Chinese children. Total anisomyopia decreased at 2-year follow up, indicating orthokeratology may be a safe clinical method to slow myopia progression coupled with reducing interocular axial length difference. 

Combination atropine orthokeratology

Combination atropine treatments: when more is more

Atropine is a treatment for myopia control, but do combination treatments such as with orthokeratology increase the efficacy? Learn about how well it works, which concentration, for whom it works best, side effects, treatment duration and more.

Can using atropine enhance myopia control with orthokeratology?

This meta-analysis of 5 studies of 1, 6 and 12 months duration found that slower axial growth is evident when using orthokeratology in conjunction with atropine as a combined therapy compared to orthokeratology alone. A slowing effect of 0.09mm was seen with the combined approach for up to a 12 month follow-up period. Longer data was not available for the meta-analysis.

Adult-onset myopia: measurement and management

Myopia which onsets in childhood usually stabilizes in the early twenties. How should we manage adult-onset myopia and progression? This case investigates factors, diagnostic measurements and management of adult-onset myopia.

How common is microbial keratitis in children wearing orthokeratology?

The risk of microbial keratitis (MK) in orthokeratology-wearing children was shown in a 2013 analysis to be around 14 per 10,000 patient wearing years, but new data indicates that it may be lower. Data gathered from a large group of practices in Russia found MK risk of around 5 per 10,000 patient-wearing years, similar to the risk of daily wear soft lenses. This should increase confidence in fitting orthokeratology to children for myopia control.