The next generation – DIMS and H.A.L.T. technology spectacle lenses for myopia control

The newest myopia controlling spectacles can both correct and control myopia as effectively as contact lens options. How do Defocus Incorporated Multiple Segments (DIMS) and HIghly Aspherical Lenslet Target (H.A.L.T.) technology spectacle lenses work? Here we investigate and compare their design, presumed mechanism and comparative efficacy for myopia control, based on published research.

One-year myopia control efficacy of spectacle lenses with aspherical lenslets

This study reports one year results from an ongoing randomized clinical trial examining spectacle lenses with highly aspherical lenslet (HAL) or slightly aspherical lenslet (SAL) technology. The findings showed the HAL lens controlled refractive and axial progression by 60-70% and SAL by 30-40% over the first 12 months.

Spectacle Lenses for Myopia Control Part 3: new designs and latest studies

Providing spectacle correction is one of the cornerstones of primary eye care, and myopia controlling spectacles can both correct and control myopia. Here we explore the current myopia controlling spectacle lenses which have or are being commercialized, for which peer-reviewed publications are available – their design, presumed mechanism and comparative efficacy.

Influence of orthok treatment zone diameter and pupil diameter on myopia progression

This study evaluates how orthok treatment zone diameter influences change in refraction and axial eye length over 1-year in children previously fit with orthok lenses of varying back optic zone diameter, to reveal that where treatment zone diameter was less than pupil diameter orthok’s myopia control efficacy appeared to be improved.

Gauging success in myopia management

How can you tell if your myopia management strategy has been a success? Our new Myopia Profile ‘Managing Myopia Guidelines’ infographics translate research into practice, providing advice on gauging success by both refraction and axial length outcomes. Given that refraction is universally measured in clinical myopia practice, there is particular emphasis on understanding how much refraction change after a year of treatment indicates whether expected efficacy for that intervention has been attained.

A tale of two studies measuring change to axial length in myopia

Being able to assess myopia progression in a similar way to height and weight using growth curves is beneficial for both practitioners and patients as it provides a comparison against a calculated average, helping to predict future high myopes and track progression and control outcomes. How to growth charts from European and Asian studies compare? We explore the comparisons, advantages and disadvantages of using growth charts for axial length in myopia.

How to assess the efficacy of myopia control treatments

This landmark paper examines the theory underlying the reporting of myopia control efficacy and the sequelae of such investigation. The authors propose an alternate method of reporting efficacy; Cumulative Absolute Reduction in Axial Elongation (CARE), which conveys the benefit that a child receiving a specified treatment might expect, independent of age, progression rate, refractive error and ethnicity over a stated time period.

Which atropine dosage should I prescribe for myopia control?

The research information on using atropine for myopia control is evolving. Previous research indicated 0.01% atropine was best, but newer research says otherwise. In this clinical case, practitioners discuss treatment strategies, which are put in research context with clinical pearls for practice.

Adult Myopia Progression

Adult Myopia Progression, and how to treat it

Adult myopia progression is frequently encountered in practice, yet we have almost no evidence base to guide management. Here we explore how often and how much myopia progression occurs in adulthood, and management options.