A successful spectacle lens fitting for myopia

In this case, a colleague has his first experience with the new Essilor Stellest spectacle lens for childhood myopia, with discussion including when to change the prescription and when to stop treatment.

Understanding the new Essilor Stellest spectacle lens

Spectacle lenses which effectively control myopia progression are the next phase in widespread uptake of myopia management. Learn more about the Essilor Stellest lens, from myopia control to vision and visual function outcomes.

A novel ring-focus soft contact lens design for myopia control

Two prototype myopia control soft contact lens designs with non-coaxial optics showed enhanced efficacy in one design and enhanced vision in the other, compared to dual-focus and single-vision designs. This initial data is for six months, and all myopia control contact lens designs showed close to 6/6 or 20/20 acuity equivalent.

How does the myopic peripheral retina respond to multifocal contact lens wear?

Analysis of the BLINK study results showed a global more than localized impact on slowing eye growth in +2.50 CD multifocal contact lens wear. The slowed growth effects were greater centrally than peripherally. This suggests local defocus responses may not provide the full story behind myopia control mechanisms.

When axial length progresses, but not refractive error

In this case, we meet a child whose axial length has progressed 0.4mm in one year, even with myopia control treatment. Yet, his refractive error hasn’t changed. What could cause this and what is the best course of action?

Can we predict success with orthokeratology?

This study investigated the accuracy of using pre-treatment axial elongation and changes in refractive sphere in predicting myopia control success in orthokeratology. Axial length was the more accurate method for categorisation of slow, moderate or rapid progression, and fast progressors benefited the most from ortho-k wear.

Should we fit orthokeratology to a child with trichiasis?

Orthokeratology is effective for myopia control but is it suitable for a child with trichiasis and corneal staining? This case compiles the treatment suggestions for managing a young myopic patient with trichiasis from the Facebook community, with a focus on safety.

Time spent outdoors improves success with MiSight 1 day

This paper identified time spent outdoors as the key factor in predicting better myopia control outcomes in children wearing with MiSight 1 day contact lenses. Other factors which weren’t predictive included age, refraction, binocular vision findings, pupil size and time spent at near.

Does pupil size matter in contact lens fitting?

Does pupil size affect myopia control efficacy when fitting soft contact lenses or orthokeratology for myopia control? This case study explores the relationship between pupil size, various optic designs and how both vision and myopia outcomes could be impacted.

Do multi-zone myopia control lenses maintain their defocus profiles at all viewing distances?

This study showed that multi-zone spectacle and contact lenses used for myopia control provide myopic defocus at far distances. At near, changes in accommodative lag, pupil miosis and spherical aberration in individuals may mean there are lesser amounts of myopic defocus and reduced image quality. However, all the lenses were still able to provide sufficient image clarity at near for typical size print.