The latest from the IMI and what it means in practice

The International Myopia Institute released their Volume 1 of reports in 2019 and Volume 2 in 2021. Here, we explore the latest round of reports in 2021 and what they each mean for clinical practice.

IMI Report on Prevention of myopia and its progression

In myopic children, interventions to slow progression are warranted to prevent the development of high myopia and subsequent pathology and also to reduce the economic burden caused by uncorrected and pathologic myopia. This IMI Report describes the latest advice on preventing the development and progression of myopia – read the summary here.

Understanding on and off label prescribing

Understanding on- and off-label prescribing

What does on-label and off-label prescribing mean in myopia management? Here we explore this topic from the point of view of medications and medical devices, what regulatory approvals mean and how this applies to decision making and clinical processes such as informed consent.

Can myopia calculators accurately predict children’s myopia progression?

This study investigated the accuracy of the Brien Holden Vision Institute (BHVI) myopia calculator in predicting myopia progression. The extent of myopia progression over 1-2 years in children corrected with single vision spectacles was accurately predicted by the BHVI myopia calculator in 32-38% of 7-13 year old Hong Kong children. Around one-third progressed more and one-third progressed less than the range predicted by the calculator.

What happens to binocular vision during cycloplegia?

Do you check your patient’s binocular vision function after cycloplegic refraction? Is this useful? An unexpected finding in this case leads to discussion of binocular vision changes in cycloplegic conditions, ideal management for exophores, and even the impact of low-dose atropine.

minimise overcorrection avoid pseudomyopia

What is pseudomyopia? Avoiding overcorrection in children

How can we identify pseudomyopia? The IMI defines myopia as -0.50D or more when accommodation is relaxed. Yet recent data indicates that a quarter of 6-year-olds may present as myopic when they’re in fact exhibiting pseudomyopia. Explore more on this topic and how to relax accommodation for accurate refractions in children.

Compounding Complications Questions

Compounded atropine for myopia control: safe and effective prescribing

Most atropine currently prescribed for myopia control is compounded rather than being commercially mass manufactured. How could this influence research results and clinical outcomes? Learn more about compounded topical atropine including questions to ask your compounding pharmacist.

Combination atropine orthokeratology

Combination atropine treatments: when more is more

Atropine is a treatment for myopia control, but do combination treatments such as with orthokeratology increase the efficacy? Learn about how well it works, which concentration, for whom it works best, side effects, treatment duration and more.

Putting Myopia Management Standard Of Care Into Action

In 2021, the World Council of Optometry (WCO) passed a resolution that publicly declares support for myopia management as standard of care. Since then, CooperVision has supported the WCO to empower eye care professionals to put this into action, with a multilingual online resource launched and more being added throughout 2022. Explore and learn more here.

What is the effect of uncorrecting, undercorrecting and overcorrecting myopia in children?

This systematic review of 9 studies confirms that under-correction of myopia does not slow progression; rather, at least half of the studies have shown the myopia progression is accelerated. There was no benefit found in overcorrection, and the evidence for un-correction was equivocal. Clinically, this advocates for the full correction of myopia.