Frequency and prediction of myopic macular degeneration in adults

This Singapore study found that 10-12% of ALL adult myopes aged 40-80 years – not just high myopes – suffered either onset or progression of MMD over 12 years. Risk factors included each additional year of age and 1mm of axial length. The most significant predictive sign was tesselated fundus.

When axial length progresses, but not refractive error

In this case, we meet a child whose axial length has progressed 0.4mm in one year, even with myopia control treatment. Yet, his refractive error hasn’t changed. What could cause this and what is the best course of action?

Model eyes in myopia management

You may have left the concept of a ‘model eye’ back in your student days – learn how understanding the ocular power components of the eye can be applied to clinical diagnosis and management decisions in childhood progressive myopia.

Myopia incidence and progression in young adults

This cohort study from Australia reported a 14% incidence (onset) of myopia between ages 20 and 28, with almost 40% of myopes progressing by at least 0.50D. Axial length increase was also demonstrated. Risk factors were related to ethnicity, sex, sun exposure and parental myopia but not education level. This data advocates for active myopia management throughout the 20s.

The difficulty in identifying fast-progressing myopes based on prior progression

Prediction modelling for future myopic progression was found to be more accurate when factors such as age, sex and ethnicity were considered, rather than prior progression. Myopia management should be initiated when myopia is apparent regardless of prior progression, rather than waiting to assess the progression rate.

Can previous progression predict future myopia?

The SCORM study analyzed the relationship between myopia progression a year after baseline and subsequent 2-year progression for myopic Singaporean children. Progression and age at baseline were found to be strongly associated with subsequent progression. However, they were shown to have limited predictive values and other factors are likely to determine future progression.

Can we predict success with orthokeratology?

This study investigated the accuracy of using pre-treatment axial elongation and changes in refractive sphere in predicting myopia control success in orthokeratology. Axial length was the more accurate method for categorisation of slow, moderate or rapid progression, and fast progressors benefited the most from ortho-k wear.

Optimizing safety in orthokeratology

Optimizing safety in orthokeratology is crucial for successful patient outcomes. Learn about compliance challenges in children wearing ortho-k and how to manage them, as well as the latest data on safety and rates of complications as reported from clinical studies.

Orthokeratology: Is it a compliance issue or lens fitting problem?

In this case of a poor outcome in orthokeratology wear which appears to indicate non-compliance, a systematic approach highlighted the cause. Read more to learn about the systematic troubleshooting process and factors involved in compliance and successful ortho-k wear.