How to Use Myopia Profile

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Kids and contact lenses – benefits, safety and getting to ‘yes’

There are numerous reasons why contact lenses are beneficial for children, and the safety profile is high. Yet there are still barriers in the mind of the practitioner, parent and young patient to childhood CL wear. Here we address these often cited barriers, with the goal to support your clinical communication on the benefits and safety of contact lenses for kids, to move towards achieving a ‘yes’ from the parent and patient.

Which contact lens should we choose for sports?

If a child is wearing spectacles or using atropine as their primary myopia control treatment, which contact lens should we choose for sports? Is a myopia controlling contact lens needed if it will only be for occasional wear? Here we discuss the options and clinical considerations based on the individual patient.

Communicating with an ophthalmologist about orthokeratology

How do you manage your young patient when their ophthalmologist appears to have advised parents against orthokeratology? How should you communicate with the ophthalmologist about orthokeratology? This clinical case explores the aspects of safety, efficacy and benefits, including detail on the comparison of short-term risks of contact lens wear with the long-term risks of myopia.

Communicating with parents who reject myopia correction

How do you approach communicating with parents about myopia when they reject even standard single vision correction for their child? This is especially concerning given that even a full strength single vision correction is a better choice than under- or un-correction of myopia – for both myopia progression as well as the child’s functional abilities. This clinical problem is more common than you might think, especially in some regions of the world.

Keys to Communication Myopia Management

Keys to Communication in Myopia Management

Communicating the reasons, benefits and options in myopia management can be complex. Using pictures in health communications has been shown to improve patient attention, recall and comprehension of information and adherence to treatment. The Managing Myopia Guidelines Infographics are designed to guide you through the process of explaining myopia control using simple messaging and pictures. We explain the four key messages of myopia management here.

Gauging success in myopia management

How can you tell if your myopia management strategy has been a success? Our new Myopia Profile ‘Managing Myopia Guidelines’ infographics translate research into practice, providing advice on gauging success by both refraction and axial length outcomes. Given that refraction is universally measured in clinical myopia practice, there is particular emphasis on understanding how much refraction change after a year of treatment indicates whether expected efficacy for that intervention has been attained.

How to assess the efficacy of myopia control treatments

This landmark paper examines the theory underlying the reporting of myopia control efficacy and the sequelae of such investigation. The authors propose an alternate method of reporting efficacy; Cumulative Absolute Reduction in Axial Elongation (CARE), which conveys the benefit that a child receiving a specified treatment might expect, independent of age, progression rate, refractive error and ethnicity over a stated time period.

Myopic Epidemic all the screens

Is screen time to blame for the myopia epidemic?

Children are accessing screens at school, around the home and for personal entertainment at younger and younger ages. At the same time, there has been an unprecedented increase in myopia in children, with higher numbers and earlier age of onset. Read about what we do and don’t know about this link; the impact of screen time on binocular vision and dry eye in kids, and guidelines for advice to parents.