When axial length progresses, but not refractive error

In this case, we meet a child whose axial length has progressed 0.4mm in one year, even with myopia control treatment. Yet, his refractive error hasn’t changed. What could cause this and what is the best course of action?

Model eyes in myopia management

You may have left the concept of a ‘model eye’ back in your student days – learn how understanding the ocular power components of the eye can be applied to clinical diagnosis and management decisions in childhood progressive myopia.

How we can identify future myopes

The axial length growth trajectories modelled in this study revealed that regardless of a child’s age, a myopic shift of at least -0.85D and/or 0.74mm over three years suggests future myopia development. Read more about specific risk factors for younger children, and other ocular component findings in this large study of European children.

Communicating with Parents about Axial Length

Slowing axial length growth is the key goal of myopia management. In this case, parents finally agreed to myopia management once they understood their child’s axial length measurement.
Read how to communicate with parents about axial length, to support your recommendations.

The OCULUS Myopia Master in Action – Q&A with Max Aricochi

Our new Q&A format is designed to explore a particular clinical topic, intervention, product or research paper with an expert. Here, we explore the OCULUS Myopia Master with practical questions of how optometrist Max Aricochi uses it in his clinic in Austria. We also provide you some additional tips to help you put Max’s recommendations to use in your own practice.

A future high myope: diagnosis with axial length

This case study explores clinical data for a 7-year-old child whose refractive error and axial length is changing at an alarming rate. How can we best determine the rate of progression and set our management plans, using axial length?

Managing the non-myopic eye in unilateral myopia

If your patient is a unilateral myope, sometimes the myopic eye is the easier one to manage! This case study explores the options to appropriately diagnose, track and manage the non-myopic eye in a unilateral myope – where the non-myopic eye seems to be progressing faster than the myopic eye treated with orthokeratology.

Predicting future myopia from axial length

Predicting future myopia from axial length

Most clinicians are aware of myopia risk factors such as family history and visual environment, but how about axial length? This article explores how we can use the current axial length value, change in axial length, axial length growth charts, and another metric, the axial-length-to-corneal-radius (AL/CR ratio), to predict risk of a child developing myopia.