Atropine 0.01% combined with orthokeratology over two years

Atropine 0.01% combined with orthokeratology slows axial elongation to less than 0.1mm/year over two years in Chinese children aged 6-11 years. This is the equal-longest study on this topic and first to measure potential mechanisms of pupil size and choroidal thickness. The largest effect of the combination occurred in the first 6 months.

IMI Report on Prevention of myopia and its progression

In myopic children, interventions to slow progression are warranted to prevent the development of high myopia and subsequent pathology and also to reduce the economic burden caused by uncorrected and pathologic myopia. This IMI Report describes the latest advice on preventing the development and progression of myopia – read the summary here.

What happens to binocular vision during cycloplegia?

Do you check your patient’s binocular vision function after cycloplegic refraction? Is this useful? An unexpected finding in this case leads to discussion of binocular vision changes in cycloplegic conditions, ideal management for exophores, and even the impact of low-dose atropine.

Compounding Complications Questions

Compounded atropine for myopia control: safe and effective prescribing

Most atropine currently prescribed for myopia control is compounded rather than being commercially mass manufactured. How could this influence research results and clinical outcomes? Learn more about compounded topical atropine including questions to ask your compounding pharmacist.

Compounded topical atropine: is every bottle the same?

How consistent is compounded topical atropine from bottle-to-bottle? What clinical results could indicate variability? Read more in this clinical case where a miniscule change in concentration gave notably better clinical outcomes.

Pre-myopia and young age: topical atropine or not?

Is a 3-year-old too young for low-dose atropine treatment? What about if they’re a pre-myope? Learn more about balancing proactive management with the research evidence and clinical considerations.

Combination atropine orthokeratology

Combination atropine treatments: when more is more

Atropine is a treatment for myopia control, but do combination treatments such as with orthokeratology increase the efficacy? Learn about how well it works, which concentration, for whom it works best, side effects, treatment duration and more.

The LAMP Study data over three years: 0.05% atropine leads and minimally rebounds

The Low-Concentration Atropine for Myopia Progression (LAMP) Study has provided invaluable data on comparisons between 0.05%, 0.025% and 0.01% atropine treatment. The three year data has shown 0.05% to be most effective for continued treatment, while children discontinued showed a small, ‘clinically insignificant’ rebound effect. Learn more about the one, two and three year LAMP data here.

Can using atropine enhance myopia control with orthokeratology?

This meta-analysis of 5 studies of 1, 6 and 12 months duration found that slower axial growth is evident when using orthokeratology in conjunction with atropine as a combined therapy compared to orthokeratology alone. A slowing effect of 0.09mm was seen with the combined approach for up to a 12 month follow-up period. Longer data was not available for the meta-analysis.

When myopia management is not working after COVID-19 home confinement

During the COVID-19 pandemic, governments imposed home confinement and school-based learning was the normal. Has this caused more myopia? In this clinical case, the unique environment of lockdown is explored in view of myopia management outcomes.