The NaturalVue Multifocal Contact Lens – Astigmatism ‘masking’ or ‘correcting’?

When prescribing myopia controlling contact lenses for children, daily disposables are the safest modality. Only spherical corrections are available, though, which can impact lens selection for children with astigmatism. The NaturalVue Multifocal contact lens is suggested for up to 2D of astigmatism, much higher than is typical for spherical CL designs. Is is ‘masking’ astigmatism, or ‘partially correcting’ it instead?

Measuring the whole eye in myopia

Axial length (AXL) has been well established as the critical measurement in myopia control research. The measurement accuracy and link to disease risk make AXL increasingly important in a clinical setting. But what else should we measure in the myopic eye? Does the cornea change as well? Will we end up doing away with refraction? Read more on measuring the whole eye in myopia.

Refraction challenges in children – what to prescribe?

Children can be tricky to refract. Here is a challenging refraction case discussed by colleagues – while not a case of a myope, it describes useful clinical principles for prescribing for children, especially children under 6 who require particular consideration to ensure normal visual development.

Which multifocal soft lens? Refraction and safety

Here we provide clinical advice on considering astigmatism and add power choices, over-refraction and final lens power, and safety outcomes in myopia controlling soft contact lenses.

Which soft multifocal contact lens to choose for astigmatism?

Soft multifocal contact lenses for myopia control can provide a great option for children with high myopia and astigmatism. In this case study we review what options are available, including toric and sphere-plus-other options, materials and replacement schedules.

Should I fit orthokeratology to a potential keratoconic?

MCS was hesitating fitting OrthoK to a patient who showed inferior corneal steepening. Her main concern was that OrthoK may induce corneal ecstasia/keratoconus in the future and whether there is a link between OrthoK and keratoconus.

Thinking beyond myopia – managing the very high childhood myope

Children with more than 5-6D of myopia can require special consideration to ensure safe management of their ocular and systemic health. This clinical case details important aspects of care for the very high childhood myope: ophthalmology co-management, best optical corrections, parental education and eye health monitoring.

Managing a myopic anisometropic amblyopic child

This case is not your typical astigmatic myope. There are several features to this patient that require careful consideration, including high myopia, amblyopia, myopia correction and control, and eye health management.