Monocular Myopia Management

Monocular Myopia Management: unilateral and anisometropic myopia

How should you best manage children with unilateral or anisometropic myopia? Learn about what drives aniso-myopic development, associations with amblyopia and ocular pathology, and the evidence base for orthokeratology to slow aniso-myopic eye growth.

Is it really fast progressing myopia, or something else?

In this case, a 14-year-old was found to be far less myopic than their refraction and terrifyingly fast progression suggested, thanks to careful diagnosis. Learn what didn’t add up and how utilizing technology o measure the ocular components helped to solve the puzzling clinical case.

Tools myopia management

Getting started in myopia management: what equipment do I need?

What equipment do you need to get started with myopia management in practice? Here we take you through the recommendations of the International Myopia Institute Clinical Management Guidelines Report, with advice on testing and equipment required. There are also suggestions for how you can get started if you don’t have access to all the equipment described, plus what is ideal and what is necessary for best practice.

Refraction challenges in children – what to prescribe?

Children can be tricky to refract. Here is a challenging refraction case discussed by colleagues – while not a case of a myope, it describes useful clinical principles for prescribing for children, especially children under 6 who require particular consideration to ensure normal visual development.

Pseudomyopia

How to achieve accurate refractions for children

Ensuring an accurate refraction is a hallmark of best practice myopia management. Yet refractions in children can present particular challenges. Which technique is most accurate, and when is cycloplegia necessary? Covering acuity measurement, retinoscopy, autorefraction and when and how to employ cycloplegia – here are some tips to achieve the best outcomes, especially for younger children where compliance and participation in testing can be more challenging.

A myope or not? Pseudomyopia, antimetropia and more

Refraction can be challenging in children, and even more so in a complex presentation as for this case. Is this patient a myope or not? When dealing with a complex case of pseudomyopia, antimetropia and latent hyperopia, all in one patient – how should we manage the patient? The answer involves balancing goals to manage ametropia correction, binocular vision function and myopia control.