Measuring the whole eye in myopia

Axial length (AXL) has been well established as the critical measurement in myopia control research. The measurement accuracy and link to disease risk make AXL increasingly important in a clinical setting. But what else should we measure in the myopic eye? Does the cornea change as well? Will we end up doing away with refraction? Read more on measuring the whole eye in myopia.

Communicating with parents who reject myopia correction

How do you approach communicating with parents about myopia when they reject even standard single vision correction for their child? This is especially concerning given that even a full strength single vision correction is a better choice than under- or un-correction of myopia – for both myopia progression as well as the child’s functional abilities. This clinical problem is more common than you might think, especially in some regions of the world.

Do pseudophakic children need myopia control?

How does the normal emmetropization process in childhood influence refraction shifts in pseudophakes? Should a myopic shift in a pseudophakic child be viewed as myopia progression? How should they be managed and is myopia control needed? This blog covers important considerations in managing these atypical myopes.

Gauging success in myopia management

How can you tell if your myopia management strategy has been a success? Our new Myopia Profile ‘Managing Myopia Guidelines’ infographics translate research into practice, providing advice on gauging success by both refraction and axial length outcomes. Given that refraction is universally measured in clinical myopia practice, there is particular emphasis on understanding how much refraction change after a year of treatment indicates whether expected efficacy for that intervention has been attained.

A tale of two studies measuring change to axial length in myopia

Being able to assess myopia progression in a similar way to height and weight using growth curves is beneficial for both practitioners and patients as it provides a comparison against a calculated average, helping to predict future high myopes and track progression and control outcomes. How to growth charts from European and Asian studies compare? We explore the comparisons, advantages and disadvantages of using growth charts for axial length in myopia.

How to assess the efficacy of myopia control treatments

This landmark paper examines the theory underlying the reporting of myopia control efficacy and the sequelae of such investigation. The authors propose an alternate method of reporting efficacy; Cumulative Absolute Reduction in Axial Elongation (CARE), which conveys the benefit that a child receiving a specified treatment might expect, independent of age, progression rate, refractive error and ethnicity over a stated time period.

Myopic Epidemic all the screens

Is screen time to blame for the myopia epidemic?

Children are accessing screens at school, around the home and for personal entertainment at younger and younger ages. At the same time, there has been an unprecedented increase in myopia in children, with higher numbers and earlier age of onset. Read about what we do and don’t know about this link; the impact of screen time on binocular vision and dry eye in kids, and guidelines for advice to parents.

How to identify and manage pre-myopes

If our goal is to manage myopia, preventing its onset should be an even more valuable target. How can we consistently identify pre-myopes, explain the concern to parents, and how can we best manage them based on the evidence?

High Myopia in Childhood

High myopia in childhood – special considerations and safe management

Half of children with high myopia have an underlying systemic condition: ophthalmology co-management, best optical corrections, parental education and eye health monitoring are crucial. It’s also important to offer myopia control strategies while also being aware of the limitations of the evidence base. This blog provides guidance on appropriate ocular health and optical management of children with more than 5-6D of myopia.