Gauging success in myopia management

How can you tell if your myopia management strategy has been a success? Our new Myopia Profile ‘Managing Myopia Guidelines’ infographics translate research into practice, providing advice on gauging success by both refraction and axial length outcomes. Given that refraction is universally measured in clinical myopia practice, there is particular emphasis on understanding how much refraction change after a year of treatment indicates whether expected efficacy for that intervention has been attained.

Myopic Epidemic all the screens

Is screen time to blame for the myopia epidemic?

Children are accessing screens at school, around the home and for personal entertainment at younger and younger ages. At the same time, there has been an unprecedented increase in myopia in children, with higher numbers and earlier age of onset. Read about what we do and don’t know about this link; the impact of screen time on binocular vision and dry eye in kids, and guidelines for advice to parents.

How to identify and manage pre-myopes

If our goal is to manage myopia, preventing its onset should be an even more valuable target. How can we consistently identify pre-myopes, explain the concern to parents, and how can we best manage them based on the evidence?

High Myopia in Childhood

High myopia in childhood – special considerations and safe management

Half of children with high myopia have an underlying systemic condition: ophthalmology co-management, best optical corrections, parental education and eye health monitoring are crucial. It’s also important to offer myopia control strategies while also being aware of the limitations of the evidence base. This blog provides guidance on appropriate ocular health and optical management of children with more than 5-6D of myopia.

A two-year-old with low myopia – to correct or not?

Would you prescribe glasses for a young child with mild myopia? Is myopia control beneficial for a toddler? This case discussion covers whether to treat or monitor, with the research evidence for prescribing as well as clinical considerations for co-management between primary eye care and ophthalmology.

How to manage the very young myope

Most myopia control intervention studies employing spectacles or atropine enrol from age 6, and most contact lens studies enrol from age 8. So how should we manage myopes younger than this? In this blog we’ll give you some guidance on managing myopes under age 6-7 with low and moderate myopia. Children in this age group with high myopia will require primary eye care as well as ophthalmology care. This important clinical reference includes information on first steps, when and how to prescribe for both myopia correction and control, when to refer or co-manage with ophthalmology, and communication with parents.

How to manage the highly myopic toddler

A two-year-old with high myopia and astigmatism – the discussion included co-management, the best optical correction, and the lifelong management ahead. Read more on managing the highly myopic toddler.