Blog 2

Myopia is responsible for around one-third of global uncorrectable visual impairment

By Clare Maher | July 11, 2022 | 0 Comments

This abstract estimates that 29% of global uncorrectable visual impairment is attributable to myopia. This emphasizes the importance of myopia control and long-term eye health monitoring, working to prevent or reduce the risk of myopia-related ocular pathology.

Examining the posture of myopic children during various near tasks

By Clare Maher | June 28, 2022 | 0 Comments

This study investigated the working distance and head posture of Chinese myopic children while reading, writing and playing video games. The average working distance across all tasks was 24.5cm, with the shortest working distance and largest head declination observed while children played video games. There was no influence of level of myopia or accommodative lag on working distance or head position. 

IMI Report on Prevention of myopia and its progression

By Clare Maher | June 12, 2022 | 0 Comments

In myopic children, interventions to slow progression are warranted to prevent the development of high myopia and subsequent pathology and also to reduce the economic burden caused by uncorrected and pathologic myopia. This IMI Report describes the latest advice on preventing the development and progression of myopia – read the summary here.

IMI Report on Pathologic Myopia

By Clare Maher | June 12, 2022 | 0 Comments

This IMI Report takes a deep dive into pathological myopia, including its prevalence and defining characteristics. The role of optical coherence tomography (OCT) is discussed, as well as emerging treatment options. Read the summary here.

IMI Report on Impact of Myopia

By Clare Maher | June 9, 2022 | 0 Comments

This IMI Report discusses the prevalence of myopia and its impact on both the individual and society. It highlights gaps in our understanding of myopia and provides evidence to support and advocate for developing appropriate approaches and policies to manage myopia. Read the summary here.

Lifestyle changes for Chinese school children during COVID-19 home confinement

By Clare Maher | April 19, 2022 | 0 Comments

A vision-screening program was able to provide data before and after Chinese schoolchildren were confined to home learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. Overall, more hours were spent indoors and less time was spent outdoors during this time, across all age groups. The younger schoolchildren had increased incidence of myopia and faster progression, whereas an increase in the prevalence of high myopia was found in the older children.

Can myopia calculators accurately predict children’s myopia progression?

By Clare Maher | March 31, 2022 | 0 Comments

This study investigated the accuracy of the Brien Holden Vision Institute (BHVI) myopia calculator in predicting myopia progression. The extent of myopia progression over 1-2 years in children corrected with single vision spectacles was accurately predicted by the BHVI myopia calculator in 32-38% of 7-13 year old Hong Kong children. Around one-third progressed more and one-third progressed less than the range predicted by the calculator.

Can orthokeratology be used to slow the progression of anisomyopia?

By Clare Maher | March 28, 2022 | 0 Comments

This meta-analysis investigated the effectiveness of orthokeratology in controlling the progression of anisomyopia (unilateral myopia or bilateral anisomyopia) in Chinese children. Total anisomyopia decreased at 2-year follow up, indicating orthokeratology may be a safe clinical method to slow myopia progression coupled with reducing interocular axial length difference. 

Six year safety data for children wearing soft contact lenses

By Clare Maher | February 22, 2022 | 0 Comments

The long-term safety of contact lens wear in children is a known concern amongst parents and eye care practitioners alike. This six year study demonstrated successful contact lens wear in a group of 8-12 year olds, with no serious contact lens adverse events reported and no change in clinical ocular signs compared to pre-contact lens wear. This demonstrates that children as young as 8 can successfully wear daily disposable contact lenses for multiple consecutive years.

Can using atropine enhance myopia control with orthokeratology?

By Clare Maher | January 22, 2022 | 0 Comments

This meta-analysis of 5 studies of 1, 6 and 12 months duration found that slower axial growth is evident when using orthokeratology in conjunction with atropine as a combined therapy compared to orthokeratology alone. A slowing effect of 0.09mm was seen with the combined approach for up to a 12 month follow-up period. Longer data was not available for the meta-analysis.