New meta-analysis on digital device use and myopia

This new systematic review and meta-analysis has evaluated use of smartphones and tablets separately to computer use and other non-screen based near work. Results are still mixed but overall there was a trend for a slightly increased risk with mobile device use alone, which increased when combined with computer use. More objective measures of screen time are needed to further explore this link.

Two-year clinical trial results of aspherical lenslet spectacles for myopia control

This study reports two year results from a randomized clinical trial examining myopia control spectacle lenses with highly aspherical lenslets (HAL) or slightly aspherical lenslets (SAL). The findings showed the HAL lens controlled refractive and axial progression by 50-55% and SAL by around 30% over two years. Read more about the outcomes and comparisons to other myopia control spectacles here.

How do myopia control contact lenses impact binocular vision?

This study showed that aspheric multifocal soft contact lenses (Biofinity +2.50D and NaturalVue) reduce accommodative response and increase exophoria, while MiSight concentric dual-focus minimally impacts binocular vision function compared to single vision contact lenses. All myopia control contact lenses increased divergence range slightly but did not impact convergence.

Six-year MiSight 1 day clinical trial data

The MiSight 1 day clinical trial is the longest in soft lens myopia control, showing efficacy in children and teens in up to 6 years of wear. The first three years showed a 50-60% axial length and refractive efficacy. In the second three years, all control group children were switched to MiSight and showed axial growth similar to children under continued treatment, indicating benefits for commencing wear in children and teens alike.

The LAMP Study data over three years: 0.05% atropine leads and minimally rebounds

The Low-Concentration Atropine for Myopia Progression (LAMP) Study has provided invaluable data on comparisons between 0.05%, 0.025% and 0.01% atropine treatment. The three year data has shown 0.05% to be most effective for continued treatment, while children discontinued showed a small, ‘clinically insignificant’ rebound effect. Learn more about the one, two and three year LAMP data here.

Putting Myopia Management Standard Of Care Into Action

In 2021, the World Council of Optometry (WCO) passed a resolution that publicly declares support for myopia management as standard of care. Since then, CooperVision has supported the WCO to empower eye care professionals to put this into action, with a multilingual online resource launched and more being added throughout 2022. Explore and learn more here.

Selecting an option: Clinical Decision Trees in myopia management

There is no one-size-fits-all when prescribing for childhood myopia control. Which option should you choose? In this important reference article, we ask you to consider three key questions which form clinical decision trees in myopia management.

Atropine – wonder or weak treatment?

Atropine has been the apparent hero of myopia management since the 2006 ATOM1 study, and since then, low concentration 0.01% atropine has become the new hero and then fallen out of favour. This article describes how lower concentrations work to balance efficacy and side effects, which should we select now, and what newer research on formulations and combinations can tell us.

Four reasons why binocular vision matters in myopia management

Binocular vision is a much neglected (and even maligned?) domain of eye care where I’ve had numerous colleagues say their professional excitement and learning opportunities have been reinvigorated through seeing the clinical imperative and application in practice. Not only does binocular vision assessment add so much more to your clinical picture, and make optometric life more interesting, it could be the secret sauce that helps us bridge the gap towards 100% efficacy.